The Wayback Comeback: Of Fashionable Cycles

In a previous post, I asked you, Gentle Reader, about Urban Decay’s cry, “does pink make you puke?” and stated that no, in fact, it does not make this author ill.  Instead, I abhor neon, those awful bright 80s colors that keep overwhelming fashion again and again.  Why, my students ask, is fashion coming back again and again?  Why is it never new?

Of course, nothing is ever new.  Not in this world with its 15 minutes of YouTube fame and the unbridled delight it seems to have for remaking classic movies.  But there is the interpretation, the retelling of the classic tale that becomes so interesting.

Easy was a brilliant retelling of The Scarlet Letter, as Clueless was of Emma.  Claire LaZebnik’s novel Epic Fail is a genius interpretation of Ms. Austen’s Pride and Prejudice (on which This Humble Author is currently penning an academic article!).  There is talent out there in the land of interpretation and retellings, and thankfully, some of it spills over into fashion.

I am a woman built for the 1880s (bustles, long-line corsets, analine dyes) or the 1940s (a-line dresses, cute shoes with thick heels, bright red lipstick and a Rosie kerchief).  This Humble Author once went to a Halloween party as Steampunk Rosie the Riveter (picture linked on this blog!), and found the experience entirely too fun for words.  But those eras do not come back.  Instead, we are left with the 1970s and its drapings, the 1980s and its neon and power suits (and headbands, and bad hair), and the 1950s with Dior’s New Look and larger skirts.

Bring back the 1880s. Bring back the Regency era.  Bring back Rosie without her Rivets.  Let us have fashions in which we can move and sashay, wear deep, beautiful colors and light, airy garments.  Let us emphasize the parts of ourselves that we love, and let us be proud of our fashionable heritage.

Let the Wayback come back.

 

Like what you’ve read?  Visit my website: The Life and Times of the Postmodern Bluestocking.

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